Through the Instagram App and What Sharon Found There

Through the Instagram App and What Sharon Found There

Recently, I joined a marketing group on Facebook, formed to help writers and small business owners (the businesses are small, not the owners—although, they may be small, too, who knows?) improve their public profile.

It’s a tough world out there, you know. I may be famous in my own back yard—as in, a new book brings a flurry of excitement from my mother, my mother’s neighbour, my sister and my aunt—but if I’m to make any impact on the world, or even my little corner of it, I have to get my name, and my work, “out there”, wherever the heck “there” may be.

We’ve been discussing social media. Are you on Twitter? Tick. Facebook? Tick. Do you have a Facebook author page? Tick. A blog? Tick. Pinterest? Tick. Instagram? Er, what, now?  “Ah, Instagram. The new, trendy app that simply anyone who is anyone is using.”  “Okay, well I’m not sixteen and I have no idea about Instagram. Help, please?”

In the event, it turned out that most of the other people in the group had no idea about Instagram either, so I decided to march forth and try out this brave new world for myself.

Does anyone have a clue?

Does anyone have a clue?

First step—as always—was to Google it for information. First question. What is Instagram? Google was most helpful. “You’re kidding, right? I mean, how old are you? A hundred and six?” (I jest, of course. Google would never be so flippant, or so rude.) Having determined that Instagram was an app that basically lets you share photos online (you know, kind of like Pinterest, or Facebook, or Twitter…), I decided that I HAD to be part of this amazing feat of technology.

First lesson. You can’t join Instagram online. You have to download an app to your phone. Having just figured out how to turn my brand new Windows phone on, I was in the marvellous position of being able to do just that. So I duly downloaded the app. Now what?

Second lesson. You have to have a username and password. Okay, fine. I’ll just use my name. Except, my name wasn’t available. My own name! Harsh. Okay, let’s go for my own name and date of birth. Not available. Well, that was just rude. How could my own name and date of birth not be available? Who pinched them? I tried various combinations of words and numbers and not one of them was available. In desperation, I used my nickname and birthday. Aha! Allowed. So I was finally signed up for Instagram.

Third lesson. Your username is available for everyone to see. Oh drat. I don’t want to be known as that. I thought it was private. Okay, how do I change my username? Back to my beloved Google, which scratched its head, rolled its eyes, tutted in despair and said, “You do know what edit profile means?” Oh. I hadn’t noticed that. So back I went and clicked on “edit profile”. Delete username. Add new username. Done. Well, that was easy. Just add a short bio now…

41v27inqkWL

Not the actual book I didn’t win because I DIDN’T win it.

Fourth lesson. Your bio has to be very, very short. Shorter than a tweet. After rambling on, explaining how I once played the queen in a school play, and how I never got over not having my name picked out of a hat to win a signed copy of a Bobby Brewster book after the author visited our primary school, in spite of the fact that I was the only child in the class who actually read for pleasure, I was informed, quite sternly, that my bio was far too long and I’d better cut it. I deleted a sentence, then a paragraph, then a chapter. Eventually, I was down to the permitted length. Success. My bio was complete. My profile was done. Except…

Fifth lesson. For some reason I cannot fathom, Instagram had taken my Facebook profile picture and used it as my Instagram profile picture. Since the picture wasn’t even of me, this didn’t seem at all useful. Back I went to Facebook and searched, in increasing desperation, for a photograph of me that looked reasonably human and didn’t feature me posing with Benedict Cumberbatch. What do you mean, camera trickery? It was all perfectly genuine, I’ll have you know. Anyway, I finally found one where, not only am I alone, not only am I not staring in horror with my hand half over my face, pleading with someone not to take my picture, but I am actually smiling. Crikey! So I changed that to my profile picture. (When I got home from work that night, the picture had loads of likes

100% genuine *cough*

100% genuine *cough*

and nice comments. I think my Facebook friends were stunned that I’d actually posted a photo of myself. I’m not the most photogenic of people, let’s face it.) So there I was, fully signed up and all profiled up for Instagram. Except…

Sixth lesson. I had no idea what I was supposed to actually do on there. I posted on my Facebook writer’s page, announcing that I had joined, and asking, quite genuinely, “What do I do now?” Back came several replies. “We have no idea, but when you find out can you let us know, please?” I really do have to get some younger, trendier friends. So, I decided to trawl through other people’s Instagram accounts and get some idea of what I was supposed to be posting. Hmm.

Seventh lesson. There is one huge snag with Instagram. You’re supposed to do things, see things, go places that are interesting. Since I’m usually either at home, writing, or at work, er, working, this doesn’t really apply to me. I tried my Write Romantic pal, Rachael Thomas, for help first. Her account featured lots of beautiful pictures of the countryside. Well, you see, Rachael isn’t just a fantastically talented romance writer. Oh, no. She’s also a dairy farmer. So when she skips merrily out of her house in the morning, she can raise her camera phone and sing happy little Disney songs and balance little blue birds on her hand as she takes gorgeous pictures of the Welsh countryside, pretty animals and—you know—stuff like that.  I, on the other hand, live in a city. I don’t much fancy taking pictures of the dustcart blocking our way out of the road yet again, or the latest takeaway that’s opened nearby because, after all, we’ve only got thirty takeaways in our area already, or the roadworks at the end of the street that have been there for weeks, even though whoever put them there seems to have forgotten all about them. So what to do?

Here's one I made earlier- honest!

Here’s one I made earlier- honest!

Eighth lesson. Everyone has photographs of cake. I mean, everyone! People bake and then they take pictures of their culinary creations so the rest of us can a) feel suddenly in desperate need of cake and b) hang our heads in shame because we haven’t baked since nineteen ninety-eight. (That may actually be true, in my case.) Even Rachael had posted a photograph of a cake she’d made! How does she find time for that, for heaven’s sake? I turned to my other Write Romantic chum, Helen Phifer. Helen is really busy, just like Rachael. But Helen writes ghostly crime stories. She collects photos of haunted houses and—you know—creepy stuff. I can rely on Helen. Oh, Helen! Cupcakes! Seriously? But yes, there they were. Cupcakes. Okay, they were in among some creepy stuff (and some lovely stuff, too!) but they were there. I had to take photos of cake. It was obviously the way to go. A quick scout around our kitchen revealed two stale Jacob’s cream crackers and a broken custard cream. I suppose I could have photographed them as some sort of artistic statement. But no…Things were getting critical.

Ninth lesson. Instagram makes you desperate to photograph anything. I mean, anything. I spent the entire day wandering around looking at “things” and wondering if they would make a good subject for a picture on Instagram. I even trawled through old Facebook photos, trying to convince myself that I could post some of them and pretend they were new. Then I realised that I didn’t like any of them anyway, so that was pointless. I decided I would have to buy cake and start—you know—actually going out. Desperate times.

Tessa to the rescue

Tessa to the rescue

Tenth lesson. When in doubt, remember man’s best friend. Okay, so I don’t bake, and I didn’t have cake in the house, and I don’t go anywhere. But what I do have, which seems to be very acceptable, is a pet. My lovely German Shepherd, Tessa (who features in my Kearton Bay books, albeit aged by some years and with a personality that’s the opposite of the real version, but is still lovely—not that I’m plugging my books, you understand. Ahem) was most obliging. As I scoured the house, looking for something that I could take a picture of, she gave a sudden sneeze, drawing my attention to her. She was lying by the sofa and as I leaned forward to get a better look at her, she gave me a worried look as if to say, “Why are you pointing that phone at me? Get away from me, you mad creature!” Too late, Tessa! A click and I had it! Feverishly, I looked at my photograph. Ah, my beautiful dog. You are the perfect subject for my first Instagram photograph!

Eleventh lesson. Uploading, or downloading, or whatever it is you do with the wretched things, isn’t as easy as you’d think. For a start, I couldn’t figure out how to crop the picture, and Instagram likes your photos to be square. Back I went to Google. “Oh, God. It’s you again. What now?” it sighed. Still, it was very obliging, and I managed to find an app that ensured all my photos were suitable for Instagram, and I didn’t have to worry about cropping or any of that technical stuff. Problem solved. So my picture of Tessa was duly up/downloaded. Then I up/downloaded pictures of my People’s Friend pocket novel. Then pictures of my two books. Then a picture of Winter Tales (which is back on sale, by the way). Then a picture of my notebooks to show that I was about to start plotting and drafting a new book, because, after all, I’m a writer, and that was the point of joining Instagram in the first place – to remind people that I write books and they’re worth reading, even if I do say so myself (and my mum’s neighbour agrees with me, so there). The point was not to prove that I bake cakes or go places or socialise or anything like that. Right?

Hmm. I still have to work out how, why, or if I should share my Instagram photos to Facebook. I also have to fathom the mysterious world of the hashtag, so my adventures in Instagramland are not over yet. I have a feeling that I’m going to be looking at life through a lens from now on. Everything is a photo opportunity.

Look out, world. Sharon’s got a camera – and she’s not afraid to use it. In fact, she’s quite desperate…

Sharon xxx

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Mega Monday – Handle Me with Care by Helen J Rolfe

celebrationlunchhmwc

Last week saw the publication of my second book, Handle Me with Care, and it was every bit as exciting as the release of my debut novel, The Friendship Tree, back in February.

Handle Me with Care is a novel about second chances. With a tagline of ‘Her second love…his second chance’, it tells the story of Evan and Maddie, both of whom face significant challenges along the way. Maddie has been haunted by the death of her boyfriend in the 9/11 attacks and has resisted any serious relationship since. But when she meets Evan, she starts to believe in the one after the one. Evan is serially single but when he meets Maddie, he too feels a connection. But when he faces his own battle with testicular cancer, both Evan and Maddie must fight if they are to find their Happy Ever After.

Handle Me with Care

I loved writing this book. The research stage was quite lengthy given the content but it really helped me to develop my characters. I fell in love with them all and it was really hard to let them go when I’d finished!

Publication Day was tiring but fabulous. My husband took me out for lunch and a few glasses of Prosecco and as per tradition, I made a cake with an image of the book cover on top.

 

And now it’s on with the hard work of promoting Handle Me with Care and working on my next book which I hope to hmwccake2release in October this year. More details to come soon and they can be found on my Facebook page, my website or by following me on Twitter.

Helen J Rolfe x

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/helenjrolfewriter

Website: www.helenjrolfe.com

Twitter: @hjrolfe

Handle Me with Care is available on Amazon:

Amazon UK: http://tinyurl.com/purfsem

Amazon : http://tinyurl.com/ot874fa

 

Saturday Spotlight: There Must Be An Angel

So, after all the build-up and excitement, There Must Be An Angel is launched today by Fabrian Books and is available on Amazon in Kindle and paperback formats. Angel ebook cover

It’s very strange seeing all these notifications popping up on my phone, congratulating me and telling me it has arrived on people’s Kindles. My sister has just messaged me to say she’s on chapter four already! Quite a surreal feeling.

It’s the culmination of over three years work and I still can’t quite believe that it’s here. I know it will feel all too real when people start telling me what they think of it! I have to go into work on Monday, and several of my colleagues have bought it. Yikes!  The biggest test will be my mum. I really hope she likes it.

To celebrate Angel‘s arrival I’m having a launch party on Facebook today between 1pm and 3pm. There will be some rather special guests (!) lots of good food, cake, alcohol and some music. There will also be some competitions and you can win some fab prizes, including signed copies of Angel and some of the other Write 214342366Romantic novels, plus some delicious gourmet marshmallows kindly donated by Yorkshire company Art of Mallow.

Hope you can join me there, but if not, hope you enjoy There Must Be An Angel. If you do, would you consider leaving a review? Every little helps. 🙂

Thank you to everyone who has helped and supported me along the way to this moment. You’re all stars.

Love Sharon x

You can buy There Must Be An Angel here.

The Wednesday Wondering – We all love a bit of cake!

Welcome to our final Wednesday Wondering … Don’t panic if you love this slot. It’s not the final ever one. It’s just the final one in the weekly format. We love The Wednesday Wondering and, with a background in recruitment, I could quite happily make up questions for a long, long time to come. However, there are lots of other things we’d like to do on the blog so we’ve decided to launch a new format for Wednesdays. From now on, there’ll be a Wednesday Wondering on the second Wednesday of the month, a book review on the last one and posts from The Write Romantics on the remaining Wednesdays.

We hadn’t discussed these changes when I set today’s Wondering so it feels quite apt that I’ve picked a question that’s about something we associate with celebrations. This is definitely a celebration of the end of our first phase and the launch of our next. So, what is it?

_MG_2084Cake. We like cake. A lot. And, would you believe, today is National Cheesecake day!!! I found that on Google although I suspect it may be in the US rather than UK but who cares; we have an international reach! So my question to The Write Romantics is:

What is your pudding of choice and why? Where have you tasted the best ever pudding? Do you call it pudding or dessert (or perhaps something else). Let’s talk all things cakey and salivate a bit!!! (ok, a lot in my case!!!)

The worst thing is that I started a very, very, VERY strict diet yesterday so I’m munching on a dish of fruit and trying not to drool at the wonderful pictures!

Over to the Write Romantics …

Rachael says …

Wow, National Cheesecake Day. I didn’t know it existed, but you can be sure I will be celebrating it with a huge slice of strawberry cheesecake! But my most favourite desert is one I had whilst in Italy. It was so light, so delicious and sooooo…. Oh I could go on. I’ve never tasted anything like it before – or since. It is Zabaglione and was served in an elegant glass. Simply divine!

 

_MG_9130Lynne says …

National Cheesecake day? What a good idea! My sanity was once saved when I moved into a gorgeous old cottage in January and the central heating packed up straight away. Golden Syrup Sponge & Custard came to the rescue. I had to wait three days till the repair person could get to us so I went out and bought syrup sponge & custard & heated it in the microwave. It was like internal central heating and kept my daughter and I sane. It’s still my favourite winter pud, followed by lemon sorbet & fruit in summer.

 

Jay says …

Back at the start of the month we were talking about all things American and what we like best about our friends across the pond, well, let me tell you, they do puddings pretty well too.  The first time we went to Vegas, my brother actually ate six desserts at one sitting and almost earned citizenship as a result!  I think the best desert I ever tasted was a key lime pie from a little deli in Florida, but then there are Krispy Kremes and they are also responsible for inventing the hot, chocolate brownie.  So many desserts, so little time.  Time to book another trip I think!

 

P1030217Helen P says …

National Cheesecake day, well it would be rude not to. My all time favourite cake is cheesecake, especially the ones at Chandler’s Country Café which is based in Colony Candles, Lindal-in-Furness. The staff there have amazing taste in books as well because the last time I was there they told me how much they loved The Ghost House which was brilliant and it made the cake taste even better. You have never tasted cheesecake like it and the raspberry and white chocolate one is to die for. In fact now that I’m sitting thinking about it I’m going to have to take my mum there now for a coffee and a slice of cheesecake to take away the craving.

 

Helen R says …

I think I would tend to call it “dessert” but give me a week in England and I’ll be calling it “pudding”…my family would definitely use that word!

There are so many desserts to choose from, but a top for me is syrup sponge, nice and hot and perhaps with a side of vanilla ice-cream 🙂

 

Jackie says …

Cake. Ooh, we like cake- and puddings and anything sweet and unctuous.  Suet pudding and custard with syrup was an all time favourite when I was a child followed by jam Roly Poly and custard. Love Banoffi Pie, sticky toffee pudding, strawberry tarts with confectioners custard. Trifle that my sister Heather makes is gorgeous, pecan pie is delish- I could go on! The only thing I’m not that keen on is a pudding or cake made with coffee-Tirimasu or coffee and Walnut cake always disappoints, but it wouldn’t stop me eating it. I’m a lost cause!

 

_MG_9132Harriet says …

Ah, now here’s an easy question because I love puds. All of them. My mother-in-law made the best ever. After Sunday lunch (full roast plus at least six vegetables) she would produce three or four choices of pudding, all home-made, and what we couldn’t eat we took home. My favourite was summer pudding, packed full of any fruit she could lay her hands on, including raspberries and rhubarb from her own garden, and served with plenty of cream. Scrumptious! I’ve attempted to make them myself but somehow they aren’t the same. They do a pretty good version at ‘Cook’, though. I’m also a sucker for old-fashioned puds like treacle sponge and spotted dick and custard. I tend to call it pudding rather than dessert, which is as much frowned upon in ‘polite’ English circles as saying serviette instead of napkin, but I don’t really care what it’s called as long as I get one!

 

Alys says …

Ooh, this is a fabulous question!  All time favourite cake is Santiago Cake which I had in the fabulous Hundred Monkeys Cafe in Glastonbury. That place is utterly brilliant. I drink a lot of green tea and usually when I ask for it they have to go and look to see if they’ve got any teabags hidden behind the till. At the Hundred Monkeys they have a choice of five different loose green teas. It’s green tea heaven for me! Anyway, back to the cake. Santiago Cake is made from almonds, caster sugar, lemons and eggs and then you pour a lemon syrup over the top of it when it’s cooling. This cake was sublime. I was still talking about how fabulous it was over six months later. But if you want to talk about puddings then it’s got to be the sticky toffee pudding that they serve in the New Malton Inn in Malton, North Yorkshire. That’s where Jessica and I get together as she lives in Scarborough and I live in York and Malton is about half-way. It is pudding to die for. If you’re ever in Malton pop in and ask for some. In fact, it’s so good just go anyway. You won’t regret it!

 

P1040958And as for me …

I absolutely adore cake, puddings, and anything sweet. Unfortunately they don’t adore me, hence the very strict diet at the moment (or perhaps that should be they adore me too much and like to stick around!)

Alys has already mentioned the amazing sticky toffee pudding smothered in butterscotch sauce *pauses to wipe drool* which might give you an indication that I’m with Harriet in that I love old school puds like chocolate sponge, syrup sponge, jam roly-poly etc. Nom nom nom! I call them puddings or pud-puds. We were never “dessert” people in our house.

I love cheesecake too, especially American-style cheesecake. There’s an episode of Friends where Rachel gets a cheesecake delivered to her apartment by mistake and, as they don’t know where it should have gone, she and Chandler eat it. Then another one arrives and they manage to drop it on the hall floor so lie down and dig out their cutlery. That would be me. Heaven.

Cake-wise, I have a fondness for simple slab cakes like Angel Layer Cake or Iced Madeira Cake. I draw the line at things that are nutty or fruity; my cakes have to be full-on, hard-core, serious sponge situations!

 

We hope you’ve enjoyed our weekly Wonderings and that you’ll comment on your favourite cake(s) and/or pudding(s). Please continue to visit every Wednesday as we’ve not gone away; we’ve just changed our format a little.

Thanks for reading.

Jessica xx

 

 

 

 

All About America: Rhoda Baxter Finds Debut Success in the USA

It’s Independence Day in the USA this coming Friday; 4th July. I’m no history expert (isn’t that what Google’s for?) so I had to look up the year (1776) but I did know that it was the date the Declaration of Independence was signed declaring independence from the Kingdom of Great Britain. With such strong links to the US today, it’s quite hard to imagine that the UK and US were once not on the best of terms.

For a while now, the USA has held a fascination for The Write Romantics. Not because we want to go on holiday there (although most of us do) but because we’ve become increasingly aware of America as a huge and exciting market for our writing. As members of the Romantic Novelists’ Association (RNA), we often read on the online community about writers who have written for both the UK and US markets or who write exclusively for the US market and many of us have submitted our manuscripts to US publishers. While we await the verdict, we’re anxious to know more.

ImageWe’re delighted to welcome fellow-RNA member, Rhoda Baxter, back to the blog to talk about her experiences of being published in the USA.

Rhoda Baxter always wanted to be a writer, but her parents told her she needed to get a ‘real’ job and write in her spare time. So she became a scientist and now works in technology transfer. She writes contemporary romantic comedies in whatever spare time she can find around her day job and her family. Which means her parents were right all along. How irritating.

Her novel Girl On the Run (formerly Patently in Love) is released by Choc Lit Lite in June 2014. Her first paperback novel, Doctor January will be published by Choc Lit in August 2014.

Over to Rhoda …

Writing for the American market

My first publication was with a US publisher. It wasn’t planned that way, it was just the luck of the draw.

My experience is a familiar story. I had written two books, but couldn’t find an agent. I was lucky enough to get some feedback along with my rejections. They all said ‘it’s good enough, but we don’t think we can place a book with so many emails in it’. The trouble was, I’d chosen to tell the hero’s point of view entirely in emails. It was part of what made the book so much fun to write. I mentioned this at an RNA lunch and Christina Jones suggested that maybe ebook publishers might be more willing to take on something that was a little unusual. It was a good idea, so I set about doing my research.

The market for ebooks was (still is!) biggest in the US. The next biggest will probably be South East Asia. There were a few well established ebook publishers at the time (and a whole load of others that arose and disappeared within a few years). While I was going through this, someone posted a submission call on Romna – it was from a small, but established epublisher. They wanted non-erotic romance (yay), between 50 and 100K (hurrah) and, crucially, the person posting recommended them highly.

So I emailed my submission off to Uncial Press and forgot about it. Less than a fortnight later, I had an email offering me a contract for 2 years. Ebook wasn’t my first choice for a debut (not many people in the UK read ebooks at that time – ereaders only became popular here about two years ago), but hey, it was a start. So I signed up.

Editing for the US

I was lucky in that Uncial are happy to use UK spelling and, provided it’s not too confusing, UK idiom. There was still the odd dispute about ‘a herb garden’ should really be ‘an ‘erb Garden’, or whether someone could look round or whether they had to look around. All in all though, it was a fairly painless process. The only thing we could not agree on was a suitable alternative to “Phwoar”. There must be one, but we couldn’t find it. So I had to delete it. If you figure out what it is, please let me know.

As a British reader, I take Americanisms in my stride – although the phrase ‘khaki pants’ makes me snigger like a pre-schooler. It turns out some Americans aren’t overly bothered about British-isms either. I’ve had feedback saying ‘what’s an MOT? ’ and discussions about whether tea should be served cold in a tall glass, but for the most part American readers don’t mind the odd British quirkiness. I’ve also met lots of readers who say ‘I like British Fiction’.

A few months ago, I did some research – if you can call asking a bunch of people on Twitter ‘research’ – on why some American readers liked to read British books. Overwhelmingly, the answer was that they enjoyed seeing another country through the books. Readers who enjoy historical novels especially liked the authenticity that the British voice gave. In some undefinable way, they felt it ‘fit’ better. Readers of contemporary romance liked the bite and cynicism in British dialogue. Those of us who grew up watching Blackadder have a certain pace of dialogue that’s sunk into our collective psyche. It’s not easy to write purple prose when you really want your heroine to be a girl called Bob.

A word on Copyright

Copyright in your work arises automatically and it belongs to you. When you sign a publishing contract, you will nearly always be giving the publisher an exclusive licence to publish your work – the right to be acknowledged as the creator of the work remains yours.

ImageIn the UK there is no formal register for copyright works. In the US, you still have the same rights, but if you want to claim damages for copyright infringement (that’s where you sue someone for pirating your work and get back money for the income you lost), it’s best to deposit a copy of your book at the Library of Congress (http://www.copyright.gov/eco/) and pay a small fee. Most publishers will do this for you, but some small presses may not. It’s worth checking.

Any advice for new novelists on writing for the US market?

Have a look at the best seller lists in both countries over a length of time, you’ll see that, generally speaking, both lists are very similar. Don’t write for the US market or the UK market. Write the best book you can. If it’s good, people will read it. That is all.

If you’d like to know more …

Rhoda can be found wittering on about science, comedy and cake on her website http://www.rhodabaxter.com, Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/rhoda.baxter.5), Google+ or on Twitter (@rhodabaxter).

 

Thank you, Rhoda, for joining us and sharing such a valuable insight. And the advice about the US market doesn’t stop there. On Monday and Thursday, we’re joined by Lynne Connolly, prolific writer and fellow-RNA member. Then, on Wednesday, we’ll have our usual Wednesday Wondering but it will be – you’ve guessed it – USA-themed!

Julie

Pre-Publishing Nerves

26th September, 2013

Anyone who reads this blog may be aware that earlier on this year I was offered a two book deal with Carina Uk and in seven days to be exact I will be able to call myself a published writer, an author. It’s what I have dreamt about since I was in my early thirties and yes dreams do come true. As long as you work hard enough and never, ever give up.

 So how am I feeling I hear you ask? Let me tell you exactly how I’m feeling. Nervous is probably the most prevalent feeling at the moment, although the nerves are sometimes pushed to the side by a tinge of excitement. Today I met one of our lovely Town Centre Parking Attendants Kev who I haven’t seen for ages. (He also gives the best hugs ever as well as the parking tickets) He had heard through the grapevine about my book and told me he was really pleased for me and was going to download it onto his Kindle for his holiday and was going home to check out Amazon. After our conversation ended I walked away with the biggest grin on my face and it was such an amazing feeling. When I got back to my office I had an email off a colleague who also put a PS on the bottom and said almost the same thing that Kev had said, again I grinned with delight.

I am having a small launch, well more of a thank you party for my family, writing group and friends who have supported me so much these past couple of years. Where the main attraction will be the wonderful cupcakes I’m having made with tiny versions of my book on them. I have no intention of doing anything other than drinking a glass of wine and talking to everyone. You see I promised them all cake if they bought my book so I’ve kept my side of the bargain.

I even finally faced my fears yesterday and went to do a short interview with the most amazing, lovely journalist from the local paper after months of her asking me. Suzanne was fab she put my mind at rest and made it relatively painless. The picture on the other hand was painful. I’m not sure how I manage to cross my eyes and look as if I’ve just been stabbed in the back at the exact moment the flash goes off. It is a special talent.  But it’s done, for better or for worse and they have promised to run the story on the 2nd October when the book is out. What more could I ask for?

I think the thing which makes me nervous is the thought that my story, which has almost been like a fantasy life for me for the last eight years is about to be unleashed into the public domain. Where everyone from my bosses at work to my family and of course the lovely Kev will be able to read the stuff I’ve spent so long writing about, it certainly makes me feel queasy. I keep telling myself that other authors must feel the same and it’s a natural feeling, but I can’t help worry that what should be one of the greatest achievements of my life is being tainted with these nerves. I’m hoping that I’ll be able to push them to the side and enjoy the moment for what it is J

Helen xx